"Through rhythms of walking, concepts of the senses are interrogated as producing gendered, racialized, and classed bodies."


In a Sunday tweet, Canadian clinical psychologist Jordan Peterson resurfaced a year old academic study that views walking through a prism of race, gender, ableism, and "settler colonialism."


The study, titled "Walking Methodologies in a More-than-human World," was published in December.

​Peterson called the work "embarrassing" and urged young people to "stay away" from the modern humanities.

The New Real Peer Review, a Twitter account that highlights bizarre and absurd academic papers, shared several screenshots of the study


One passage from the study contains a description of walking as having "a diverse and extensive history in the social sciences and humanities."


"The book carefully carefully considers the more-than-human dimensions of walking methodologies by engaging with feminist new materialisms, posthumanisms, affect theory, trans and queer theory, Indigenous theories, and critical race and disability scholarship," the study's authors, Stephanie Springgay and Sarah E. Truman, wrote. "These more-than-human theories rub frictionally against the history of walking scholarship and offer crucial insights into the potential of walking as a qualitative research methodology in a more-than-human world."

One of the book's endorsers, Dr. Kathryn Yusoff, argued walking "typifies the dual experience of colonialism," in that a "lone white subject" is "surveying His landscape as possession and disaporic subjects walking their displacement and disposession." 

​Yusoff claimed that Springgay and Truman's work provided "an interrogating praxis for walking within the colour lines of race, the patriarchies of gender, the possession of settler colonialism, the ableism of the ideal body, and the anthropocism of human exceptionalism."

In Western Sydney University professor Margaret Somerville's endorsement, she calls the study "essential reading for anyone seeking to engage with the complex problems planet earth is posing for humanity in these precarious times." 


"Thinking always through transcorporeality, new ontologies are both offered and questioned," Somerville wrote. "Through rhythms of walking, concepts of the senses are interrogated as producing gendered racialized and classed bodies."


Twitter commenters responding to Peterson's tweet were less than impressed with "Walking Methodologies in a More-than-human World." 

Several users argued that the academic buzzwords riddling the study made it nearly ​incomprehensible


Others had a more tongue-in-cheek reaction.

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