“He is guileless, and he wears his sincerity on his sleeve.”


Howard Schultz last week announced that he was stepping down as the executive chairman of Starbucks, and hinted that he might run for president. 


"For some time now, I have been deeply concerned about our country — the growing division at home and our standing in the world,Schultz told The New York Times Monday. “One of the things I want to do in my next chapter is to figure out if there is a role I can play in giving back. I’m not exactly sure what that means yet.” 


He said he wanted to avoid "creating speculative headlines," saying, “I intend to think about a range of options, and that could include public service. But I’m a long way from making any decisions about the future."


President Donald Trump's surprise victory in the 2016 presidential election has fueled speculation that other prominent businesspeople could follow in his ​political footsteps. 


However, a lot of Schultz's fellow Seattleites have expressed skepticism given the businessman's ​2016 sale of the city's NBA team, the Seattle Supersonics. 


On Wednesday, Seattle Times columnist Danny Westneat wrote a takedown of Schultz headlined "Howard Schultz, 2020? We in Seattle know he’d be a lamb to the slaughter." The column argued if Schultz couldn't handle the Sonics deal well, he would never be able to take on the entire nation.


Westneat called out Schultz for allegedly sacrificing his local loyalties in the interest of business and said this boded poorly for his presidential prospects. 


"Politics, though, is nothing but the local," Westneat wrote. "This is one reason global business executives tend to make terrible politicians."


Westneat also said Schultz was not ruthless enough to take down Trump. 


"To eat the likes of Trump, or whatever’s left of Trump’s administration in 2020, calls for nothing less than a political shark," wrote Westneat. "Not a Seattle lamb who got fleeced by the Okies but good."


In an op-ed for Bloomberg on Tuesday, Joe Nocera wrote in an article titled "I Hope Howard Schultz Doesn't Run for President" that Schultz "doesn't have the stomach" to run and called him "guileless."

Seattleites on Twitter were similarly unenthused by a potential Schultz presidential run. 


Mike Gastineau, a longtime local talk radio host, ran a poll asking which country a President Schultz would be most likely to "sell America to when things get tough."

Seattle sports journalist Danny O'Neil said the only reason to root for Schultz to run was the hope that he might finally be forced to explain his decision to sell the Sonics. 

Conservative Seattle commentator Jason Rantz joked that Schultz is so hated that he might push residents of his overwhelmingly Democratic city to vote for Trump.